New SharePoint Modern Power BI Theme

If you are creating Power BI content that you are embedding into a SharePoint Modern page, you know that the default Power BI theme colors don’t match SharePoint’s colors. Not to worry, we’ve got you covered. 

Attached to this post and also cross-posted to the https://Community.PowerBI.com Theme Gallery is the Tumble Road SharePoint Modern theme. This theme uses the core Modern experience colors in SharePoint, assuring your Power BI content will look great when embedded within SharePoint.

Download the zip file here.

TIP: How to make your Power Query M code self-documenting

What were you thinking?

Do you remember exactly what you were thinking three months ago when you wrote that rather involved Power Query M statement? Me neither. So, why suffer when you can easily avoid the pain of code archaeology in Power BI? Piecing together a forgotten thought process around a particular problem can be a time consuming and frustrating task.

We’ve all seen this

You’ve seen Power Query M code like below. Chances are, you’ve created M code like below as well. You will be looking at this in a few months, thinking to yourself, removed what columns?!? and then I change the type. Awesome, what type and why did I do this?

Leverage these functions to hold your thoughts

I’ll take you through two features that you can use to document your thought process as part of your Power Query M code in Power BI. Your future self will love you for taking a few minutes to leverage these features to document your thought process. It also makes maintenance a breeze as it is rather easy to figure out where your data is retrieved.

Discipline is key…

Please note, this can feel tedious to do. It is quite easy to create many transformations in a short amount of time. If you take a few minutes to do this when  it is fresh in your mind, you’ll be better positioned if there are issues later or if you need to add functionality. The default names of the steps, like Renamed Columns 3 are not very helpful later.

How do I document my steps?

There are two techniques you can use to make your M code serve as documentation.

First, you can right click on a transformation step and select Rename to be whatever you wanted to document. For example, Renamed Columns above could be renamed to Renamed custUserID to User ID. This makes it very clear what was done.

Second, if you need more room to fully document a transformation step, right click on a transformation step and select Properties. The description field can be used for long form documentation.

Finished Product

We started with this list of transformations on a SharePoint list.

After taking the time to rename each step with what and why, it now looks like this.

I hope you find this post useful! If you have any questions, post them below in the comments.

UPDATE: This technique also works in Excel’s Power Query Editor as well.

How to sort your dataset columns alphabetically in Power BI

Power BI Accidental Tip

This tip came about by accident. I was working on a new class exercise for https://sharepointna.com when I came across an easy way to sort your dataset columns alphabetically.

While column search in the Query Editor makes this less necessary, it is very useful when working with DAX where you are in the same data grid and scrolling left and right. Yes, you could use the field search or the field picker, but I prefer for my dataset to be in a predictable order.

Caveat

This tip works right now with the March 2018 release of Power BI Desktop. There’s no guarantee it’ll work with future releases of Power BI Desktop.

OK, so how do I sort my dataset columns alphabetically?

  • From Power BI Desktop, click Edit Queries
  • On the Home tab in the Query Editor, click Choose Columns
  • Click the AZ button in the upper right and select Name
  • Click OK
  • Click Close and Apply.

Yes, that’s it. Now your dataset columns are sorted in alphabetical order. Normally I do this as my last transformation, after all others have been specified.

Creating Power BI Report Backgrounds the easy way!

Are you still putting boxes around your Power BI graphics?

Stop boxing your data! Boxes add unnecessary visual noise and can make it hard to see your graphics. We present a better way to add style to your data story in Power BI.

These techniques enable you add a graphical background to your Power BI reports, using the power of Microsoft PowerPoint!  Nothing to buy or install. Graphical backgrounds provide flexibility in styling while reducing effort to achieve a great looking Power BI report.

I’ll take you through two separate ways you can implement these backgrounds and point out pros and cons to each approach. I’ll also show you what to consider when you have to support both web and mobile reports.

I hope you enjoy! Please leave your comments below.

If you are in Washington, DC at the end of March, 2018, join us for our Power BI workshop at SharePoint Fest DC!

Integrating CA PPM Data Warehouse security with Power BI RLS

Background

Tumble Road has partnered with CA Technologies over the last year, to make their reporting more Power BI friendly. At CA World 17, we helped introduce the new OData connector to the CA PPM Data Warehouse to attendees.

The CA Need

The CA PPM Data Warehouse (DWH) has very rich security support at the user level and at the role level. However, when the OData connector was originally in beta, a need to replicate this security functionality within Power BI was noted. If we were not able to have Power BI consume the CA PPM DWH security model, this would make Power BI a non-starter for many companies.

The Power BI Solution

Row Level Security within Power BI was the answer to carrying forward the DWH security model. Power BI enables filtering of data based on the current Azure Active Directory (AAD) User ID. Since all Power BI users have to have an AAD User ID, part of the solution was at hand.

The CA PPM DWH has a security table that lists every entity for which a user can access. This information is used by Power BI to security the data.

However, CA’s solution does not use AAD so a mapping exercise may be needed between the CA User Name and the Microsoft User ID. The video below shows a very simple case where we are able to append the Office 365 domain name to the CA User Name to get the requisite AAD User ID.

Your particular situation may require a more extensive mapping exercise. Elaborate mappings can be done in Excel and imported into the model. This imported mapping data can be used with the Security table to implement the requisite information.

The Presentation

In the video below, I show you how to bring the Security table from the Data Warehouse into Power BI and use the data as a basis for applying Row Level Security within Power BI. This should restrict the data to only that that the person is authorized.

Microsoft Ignite 2017 Session Picks!

It’s that time again and if you are headed to Microsoft Ignite 2017 and are overwhelmed with the session choices, here’s some recommended sessions to check out.

Power BI – Microsoft Ignite 2017

If Power BI is your interest area, here’s some great sessions to check out.

Dive into effective report authoring using Microsoft Power BI Desktop 

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/53124

Miguel Llopis and Will Thompson

Session code: BRK2111

Microsoft Power BI Desktop is a tool that allows data analysts, data scientists, business analysts, and BI professionals to create interactive reports that can be published to Power BI. Join us during this session for a deep dive into the report authoring, data preparation, and data modeling in Power BI Desktop. Topics covered include third-party connectors, data exploration, and data visualization. This session includes lots of demos, including what’s new in Power BI Desktop and what’s coming.

Managing Space and Time with Visio and Power BI

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/55898

David Parker, Scott Helmers

Session code: THR2177

You’re attending Ignite. You’ve registered for 15 sessions. The sessions are located in more than 300 meeting rooms. The meeting rooms are spread across nearly three million square feet in the Orange County Convention Center. What tools do you have that can help you to maximize your time and minimize unnecessary walking?

  • You have a list of sessions.
  • You have a floor plan.
  • You have a clock.
  • Best of all, you also have Visio Professional and Power BI!

Learn how you can use the data mining, operational intelligence, and data visualization capabilities of those products to navigate the cavernous convention center more effectively.

Mining Yammer data for gold using Microsoft Power BI

Melanie Hohertz, Dean Swann, Becky Benishek, Simon Denton, Loni French

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/53789

Session Code:  BRK2148

It’s a noisy conversation around enterprise social right now. But when you cut through to the signal, Microsoft’s data says Yammer is growing faster than ever. If you want data-driven decisions and value in social collaboration, analytics have never been more critical. Join a group of Yammer experts as they explore the importance of taking the broad view of Yammer data. Attendees get an overview of Power BI and a review of the Office 365 Content Pack, focusing on Yammer. We take an in-depth look at the “art of the possible” with Yammer data in Power BI, with real-world examples. Come see the power of Yammer, expressed in data that mines the gold for hands-on community managers and executive stakeholders.

Learn how to apply advanced analytics for Microsoft Project & Portfolio Management (PPM)

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/53818

Jackie Duong,  Rick Bojahra,  Michael Patrick

Session code: BRK3025

Empower decision making by unlocking business insights. Take your reporting capabilities to the next level through Power BI and other analytics tools, with easy-to-use live data monitoring to show your data in a simple and compelling way. Hear directly from the global leader in designing and manufacturing water parks, WhiteWater, who deployed Project Online alongside Microsoft Dynamics and Power BI to optimize their business.

SharePoint Search – Microsoft Ignite 2017

There’s a lot of renewed interest in search and these speakers are worth your time. I’d recommend the following sessions in this area.

Accelerate productivity with search and discovery in SharePoint and Office 365

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/53316

Kathrine Hammervold, Naomi Moneypenny

Session Code: BRK2181

Effective search needs to know what information that is relevant to you, your colleagues, the work you do and your context right now. Find out how we have used insights across Microsoft Office to create such a personalized search experience. A new search UX has been developed focusing on simplicity and performance enabling the user to quickly interact with a more personal and semantic organization of data. Find out how search now also supports multi-national corporations and how hybrid search works with the Microsoft Graph. Also learn about the roadmap for enterprise search in SharePoint and Office 365 for experiences, extensibility and the convergence of FAST and Bing search innovations.

Build your personalized and social intranet with SharePoint, Yammer, Delve, OneDrive and Teams

https://myignite.microsoft.com/sessions/55059

Naomi Moneypenny, Brian Duke, Rick Garcia, Greg Nemeth

Session Code: BRK2185

Hear how other companies have recently built their intelligent intranets and learn how to use capabilities of SharePoint, OneDrive, Office Delve, Yammer, Microsoft Teams to create cohesive experiences for productivity and cohesive digital culture. Explore how to empower business users and site owners with the tools and guidance they need to create, target, personalize, and consume content as well as bring rich interactivity for different business scenarios. The intranet of the future awaits!

Not going to Ignite? Check out our Training classes!

Virtual Public classes and Private on site classes are available!

Check Out Our Classes!

The one surprising thing about Visio Integration in Power BI

I was introduced to the new Visio custom visual for Power BI during the Microsoft Inspire convention. After a few minutes, I was impressed with the power and simplicity of it. It helped solve a problem that we’ve had when building out Power BI reports.

Telling a Complete Digital Story

In my Power BI classes, I talk about the importance of creating complete digital stories. They are complete in that you have three components, which allow the story to be understood in a standalone fashion. The three components are

  • Where are you
  • Where do you need to be
  • What is the path or connection between the two states

Think of Visio integration as the easiest way to show your data road map. The Visio diagram can add needed context to the overall picture. Adding proper context with a great diagram makes it much easier to interpret the results, make critical decisions, and take necessary actions.

Quick Power BI Example

Imagine you are a banker and you are trying to assess the current state of your loan process. Throughput is a very important to this process and you want to avoid things getting hung up as this impacts profits. Clients also get upset when they miss closing dates as they can lose real estate deals.

Today, Showing Data without Context

Today you have a Power BI report with various visuals that provide health metrics. You can easily see things like which step has the highest average age of items. You can even see with the bubble chart the overall distribution of steps by Average Age and Item Count.

However, the story isn’t very compelling and it doesn’t answer a key question, what else will be impacted if I don’t fix process step X? Do you clearly know where to focus your attention?

Tomorrow, Your Data In Context

Compare to this report where we’ve added a Visio diagram of the process. The diagram serves as a heat map. Areas that have high aging average values will be in Red. Those in danger are in Yellow and everything else is green. I can still answer the questions I had before. However, now I can see in a glance where I have too many “old” loans in process and what will be impacted downstream.

As I click on any visual on the report, the Visio diagram will zoom to the related step. If I click on the red process step in the Visio diagram, all other visuals on the page are filtered. These behaviors encourage further exploration of the data.

Surprisingly Easy to Implement

The one thing that surprised me about this visual is how easy it is to incorporate Visio diagrams you already have into your Power BI reports. The mechanics are such to make it very easy to map data to the shapes.

Scenario

I want to replace the Visio Diagram above with an existing one that I have. It shows the four major phases of the process. I want to use this diagram on an Executive version of the report, where I don’t need great operational detail.

Prepare Your Diagram

Step Action Diagram
Take your existing diagram and do this:
Design, Size, Fit to Drawing.
This helps reduce the white space around the drawing
The canvas will appear as shown.
Save your diagram using File, Save
If the diagram is not already in an Office 365 SharePoint folder, upload the diagram to a location that the consumers of the report would have access.
    
Click on the diagram to view it in the browser
Copy the URL as you’ll need this later in Power BI to insert the diagram.

Replace the Existing Visio Visual with a New Instance

Step Action Diagram
Open the model in Power BI Desktop
Select the Visio custom visual that shows the existing diagram
Go to the Visualization area and select another visual type. This resets the Visio custom visual
Click the Visio icon in the Visualization area to change it back
Paste in the URL of your diagram that you saved earlier.
Click Connect and login

Map Your Data to the Diagram

There are two tasks that are generally required when adding an existing diagram to a Power BI report.

  1. Replace the column value in the ID field.
  2. Map each shape to a data value in the ID column.

The procedure below will take you through the steps to do both actions.

Update the Column Values in the ID Field

Step Action Diagram
In Power BI Desktop, go to the Fields tab for the Visio visual. Drag the new ID column value over the existing column value.
Now Phase is in the ID Field.

Map Shapes to Data Values

Step

Action

Diagram

Click the < on the Field Mapping bar in the Visio Custom Visual
You will see the ID: field highlighted in yellow
Click the dropdown next to the ID field name. You’ll see the list of data values from the ID column shown.
To map a shape to a data value, select the shape, then select the data value to map to it.
Repeat for each shape and data value.
When you are done, collapse the ID field
Review the Values Settings below.
If you want to show the actual value, change the Display As to Text
OR
If you want to show the value in the form of a heat map, change the Display As to Colors. Set the colors and range accordingly.
Save and Publish Your Power BI model.

Live Example

When you see your report online, you can either click any box in the Visio diagram to filter all other visuals or you can click another visual to filter the Visio diagram.

An example of this report can be found below.

Conclusions

As you’ve seen, the mapping feature makes it quite easy to incorporate any existing Visio diagram into a Power BI dashboard. You can now add things like Org charts, process maps or other visual data for filtering in your reports.

More Information

If you want to know more, check out these links.

Want to Learn More? Register for one of our virtual training classes today!

Value.Compare in Power BI, An Advanced Power BI Class Excerpt

Course Image

This post is an excerpt from our Advanced Power BI class.

Importance of Data State

Analyzing data states in the data collected is generally the primary focus of our Power BI analyses. We look at aspects related to standards, compare dates to today’s date and execute other such comparisons. The business user who consumes your data is very focused on specific data states, which are defined and driven by their internal business rules. These rules will tend to change over time as the business evolves. Hence, it is important to implement your state definitions in a way that is flexible and reduces the number of changes necessary to implement a changed business rule.

Introducing Power BI Value.Compare

You’ll learn a technique using Power BI M Value.Compare, which enables you to easily convert dynamic ranges into states while reducing your data model maintenance effort. The need for this is that states, such as those of overdue invoices or tasks, where a large number of variances is returned, can create challenges which result in pieces of business logic being implemented in several different locations, like visual filters, etc.

Value.Compare enables you to easily convert the large number of potential values into a discrete set of states. This technique encapsulates the business logic into one place, reducing long term maintenance effort and places to maintain the business logic when the business rules inevitably change over time.

You’ll see two examples of Value.Compare usage. One example will show you how to use the function with comparing appointment dates to today’s date and converting variances to a state. We’ll show you how to use embedded data type conversions to prepare the data so that you can use Value.Compare. The other example will show how to use Value.Compare to determine Service Level Agreement compliance, based on duration values. This will show you an easy way to implement this logic and how to externalize the comparison value using a parameter.[/fusion_text][/fullwidth]

Creating Beautiful Power BI Slicers

This post addresses one of several common challenges for new Power BI users face. We’ve compiled a list of challenges, based on Our Real World Power BI training series.

Making your Power BI slicers visually distinctive.

Many new users can create slicers in Power BI to enable the end user to dynamically explore their data. However, many don’t know about the styling options that can make your slicers visually distinct and finger friendly for touch devices.

The video below takes you through the steps to beautify your slicers.